Books you're reading (9 Viewers)

Buck Fuddy

Lara Chedraoui fanboy
May 22, 2009
10,490
Currently reading (actually almost done with it) "Mindfuck" by Christopher Wylie about the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Yeah, I know, I'm late to the party, but there are some things in there I didn't know yet. And even if the Russia angle remains a bit vague when it comes to Trump, Brexit, etc, it does tie in nicely with what's currently going on.
Actually, reading this book right now, a few years "late", is pretty interesting. As we've seen a lot of things being played out by now. Hell, this was written before corona, so it doesn't have anything to do with it, but similar misinformation was obviously key during the pandemic as well.
 

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Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
87,965
Been reading quite a lot this year. Recently I went with Shakespeare (Macbeth and King Lear). Reading Bruno Schulz was delightful, he's incredible and magical. I also enjoyed more books from Pekic who's one of my fav writers surely. Right now I'm on As I Lay Dying.
 

Maddy

Oracle of Copenhagen
Jul 10, 2009
16,531
Half of you nerds culdn't even read you birth certificate. Yet I'm reading light entertainment:

Classics from the 20s and some elitist russians. Why does this shithole of a country have the greatest novelist? Impressive.
 

Post Ironic

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2013
39,566
GordoDeCentral

You should read “Marginalia on Casanova”, the first volume of Miklos Szentkuthy’s “St Orpheus Breviary”

It’s a uniquely fascinating philosophical discourse of sorts on Casanova’s memoirs, an exquisite and dizzying odyssey through ideas of love/Eros in 18th century Europe.

Apparently it was condemned for being blasphemous and profane when first published in 1939 Hungary.

@Dostoevsky you too. :)

@s4tch Your nation has the best of literature :delpiero:

These lines:
“That is the way of it, a law of nature, and few woman can live with it: anyone who genuinely loves them as they dreamed for themselves will, by nature, also love many other women, because his remarkable born-for-lovingness is inseparably identical to Don Juanism. Anyone who loves them with undying fidelity in comfortable monogamy is going to lack the raging fire that is love’s sole sense, the carmine delirium. Just as one of Casanova’s Janus-faces is Brunelleschi, the other is Ariosto, of whom he never could have enough and knows of by heart because he is more Romantic than any Romantic; it is just that the body makes a fool of one, the ‘spirit’ (in the amatory sense) - an idiot. Most likely the reason Toscanini was a good musician is that he has not the remotest idea about what some people are in the habit of calling the ‘content’ of a work.”
 

Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
87,965
GordoDeCentral

You should read “Marginalia on Casanova”, the first volume of Miklos Szentkuthy’s “St Orpheus Breviary”

It’s a uniquely fascinating philosophical discourse of sorts on Casanova’s memoirs, an exquisite and dizzying odyssey through ideas of love/Eros in 18th century Europe.

Apparently it was condemned for being blasphemous and profane when first published in 1939 Hungary.

@Dostoevsky you too. :)

@s4tch Your nation has the best of literature :delpiero:

These lines:
We didn't translate that :cry:
 

Post Ironic

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2013
39,566
Never tried any "serious" book. I always doubted my vocabulary when it comes to high literature. I also hate ebooks. But that book sounds really interesting.

Btw, what do you recommend from Hugarian literature?
I think you could easily do it. You seem to have a better vocabulary than a lot of English first language folk. I hate ebooks too. Contra mundum press published it, and I believe it’s available through most online booksellers for a reasonable price being paperback, but I’m not 100% sure there.

Hungarian lit. Definitely László Krasznahorkai and Miklos Szentkuthy first and foremost. Peter Nadas, Antal Szerb, Magda Szabo, Gyula Krudy, Mor Jokai are all good writers too.
 

Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
87,965
I think you could easily do it. You seem to have a better vocabulary than a lot of English first language folk. I hate ebooks too. Contra mundum press published it, and I believe it’s available through most online booksellers for a reasonable price being paperback, but I’m not 100% sure there.

Hungarian lit. Definitely László Krasznahorkai and Miklos Szentkuthy first and foremost. Peter Nadas, Antal Szerb, Magda Szabo, Gyula Krudy, Mor Jokai are all good writers too.
You read Marai and/or Imre? I think about getting Fatelessness soon. I'm also having György Konrád on the radar.
 

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